2014

NOSC is starting to get land donated, transferred or leased to it by individuals who are interested more in promoting organic production than in making money, although they do get some financial return on their resources. NOSC already has 7 hectares under an innovative set of arrangements, and it expects soon to be managing 50 hectares. This area could expand much further given the flexibility of these arrangements and the win‐win‐win structure of incentives they offer.

The land donated or leased to NOSC is operated by paddy farmers whom it has trained in SRI methods and who receive a good basic wage, better than most farmers with little land can earn. They have an incentive to use the new methods well because they receive also one‐third of the value of any production over 7 tons/hectare (t/ha) as a bonus. Because the rice produced is organic and high quality, it gets a better market price than ordinary paddy, and this makes the operation is more profitable.  

Meeting the production target of 7 t/ha, about 75% higher than the average paddy yield in Indonesia, can cover all of the costs of production. These include farmers’ earnings, whatever payment has been agreed upon for the land, and also NOSC’s management costs. It the yield exceeds the target, the landowner who has leased land to NOSC also gets a third of the extra production as a bonus, and NOSC gets the final third as its return for doing successful management. If the land has been donated to NOSC as a kind of endowment, NOSC receives the share of the payments du e to land to add to its revenue.  

This business model is good for all parties. (a) Farmers are assured of an income greater than usual from paddy farming with conventional methods. (b) Landowners get a good income from their land and are freed from the headaches of managing their land; they also get the satisfaction of nudging paddy production in Indonesia toward more environmentally‐friendly practices. (c) NOSC generates a stream of income to support and expand its training and other activities.

NOSC is also supporting research on SRI, especially but not exclusively on organic SRI. It has a number of trials ongoing at the center in Nagrak, and NOSC been given 2.4 hectares of paddy land in Bogor, which is available for researchers, and especially students, to carry out trials there. The country’s leading agricultural university (IPB) is close by, so this is a good location, but others can also use the research plots. The National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) is currently carrying out some experiments there aimed at shortening the crop cycle of a popular traditional rice variety using SRI methods.

2007

NOSC began organizing organic agriculture training, especially rice cultivation using the organic SRI method, conducting research and providing agribusiness consulting services. This led to an acceleration of organic farming development activities at NOSC that includes a rice mill processing and marketing and distribution of organic rice. Everyone needs space and time to rejuvenate their spirits so that they can return to their city-living life afresh. NOSC started to offer play-as you learn programs for family friends and their loved ones in an effort to create awareness on organic farming. This period also started to see NOSC's increased program activities with the government, NGOs and other organizations. The pinnacle event culminated in the visit of the Indonesian President, Susilo Bambang Yudhyono to NOSC to officiate in its inauguration.

1998

Founder Ahmad Jatika embarked on his newfound passion in organic farming and started learning about the SRI method. He collaborated with a few parties in trying to establish an entity dedicated to the pursuance of excellence in the SRI Organic methodology. Came into contact with Professor Norman Uphoff, an expert in the SRI method from Cornell University and learnt in-depth about the SRI method. 

He began to eye a piece of real estate in his home village of Nagrak in Sukabumi and focused on acquiring it piece by piece until he managed to assemble about 2 hectares of land to be developed into his much dreamed Center of Excellence. That modest piece that he bought using his hard-earned savings was a choice spot in Nagrak that overlooks the most breath-taking view of Gunung Salak and Gunung Gede.

2011

The Nagrak center is managed by Jatika, who was formerly engaged in a number of businesses but is now mostly dedicated to SRI promotion. The Czech branch of the international Catholic NGO CARITAS operates an NOSC center in Aceh, North Sumatra, while farmers operate the centers in Ngawi, East Java (Miyatty Jannah) and in Tasik Malaya, West Java (Hendra Kribo). Several businessmen are supporting and maintaining NOSC centers on their own in West Sumatra (Sofwandi), Bandung (Agung), West Kalimantan (Heri); and Yogyakarta (Dibyo). Three more are now being established; one in Maluku (by Sutarmin Kasnawi, a retired government official whom we were about to meet in Bandung); another in Malang (by a manufacturer with broad‐ranging interests whom we planned to meet the next day, Pierre Dermawan); and a third in Lombok (by a businessman with the name of Elvis). NOSC also has a small office in Jakarta to support activities in the capital city. But mostly it is  decentralized.

NOSC operates within Indonesia in a role similar to that which our small SRI‐Rice secretariat at Cornell University plays for SRI internationally.  Our secretariat provides information and supports training and research, but it does not operate or fund programs in the various countries with which it maintains communication and collaborative relationships.   There are already seven branch NOSC training centers, each functioning independently; and three more are being set up. None is financed by NOSC, as this organization has no funds for such support. The different centers work more as affiliates of NOSC than as branches. All have been established and then managed, respectively, by like‐minded NGOs, companies, farmers, or altruistic businessmen.  

Each affiliate has its own program for training and extension, sometimes with support from local governments or charitable institutions. Each does as much as it can, as well as it can. The core staff based at Nagrak assist with materials, visits, contacts, etc. In addition to this network, NOSC has made formal agreements to provide training on contract to other SRI programs, such as the corporate social responsibility program of PT HM Sampoerna, a major tobacco products company in East Java recently acquired by Philip Morris, and the Federal Land Consolidation and Rehabilitation Authority (FELCRA) in Malaysia. NOSC has facilitated SRI training also in Timor Leste (East Timor) and the Solomon Islands.

 

2001

Then, started a slow but sure process of realizing his dream. Piece by piece he used his personal savings to realize his vision. Work started literally one building at a time based on what he could afford at the time. In his sight is to turn that place into a center of excellence for the SRI organic method. His wish is to provide the means of education and training to poor farmers' children who could barely afford a decent education, and most of whom were not able to complete secondary education. His deepest desire is to provide a means of livelihood for these kids to be equipped for life with competency in organic farming so they can become professional farmers.

2014

NOSC is starting to get land donated, transferred or leased to it by individuals who are interested more in promoting organic production than in making money, although they do get some financial return on their resources. NOSC already has 7 hectares under an innovative set of arrangements, and it expects soon to be managing 50 hectares. This area could expand much further given the flexibility of these arrangements and the win‐win‐win structure of incentives they offer.

The land donated or leased to NOSC is operated by paddy farmers whom it has trained in SRI methods and who receive a good basic wage, better than most farmers with little land can earn. They have an incentive to use the new methods well because they receive also one‐third of the value of any production over 7 tons/hectare (t/ha) as a bonus. Because the rice produced is organic and high quality, it gets a better market price than ordinary paddy, and this makes the operation is more profitable.  

Meeting the production target of 7 t/ha, about 75% higher than the average paddy yield in Indonesia, can cover all of the costs of production. These include farmers’ earnings, whatever payment has been agreed upon for the land, and also NOSC’s management costs. It the yield exceeds the target, the landowner who has leased land to NOSC also gets a third of the extra production as a bonus, and NOSC gets the final third as its return for doing successful management. If the land has been donated to NOSC as a kind of endowment, NOSC receives the share of the payments du e to land to add to its revenue.  

This business model is good for all parties. (a) Farmers are assured of an income greater than usual from paddy farming with conventional methods. (b) Landowners get a good income from their land and are freed from the headaches of managing their land; they also get the satisfaction of nudging paddy production in Indonesia toward more environmentally‐friendly practices. (c) NOSC generates a stream of income to support and expand its training and other activities.

NOSC is also supporting research on SRI, especially but not exclusively on organic SRI. It has a number of trials ongoing at the center in Nagrak, and NOSC been given 2.4 hectares of paddy land in Bogor, which is available for researchers, and especially students, to carry out trials there. The country’s leading agricultural university (IPB) is close by, so this is a good location, but others can also use the research plots. The National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) is currently carrying out some experiments there aimed at shortening the crop cycle of a popular traditional rice variety using SRI methods.

2006

Jatika further acquired small parcels of land in the surrounding areas until he amassed a total of 4 hectares. By this time, the realization of his dream farm was completed. Along with a few like-minded individuals, the Nagrak Organic SRI Center (NOSC) was legally established as a Foundation. By then, the facility had its own living dormitories, a few plots of padi fields, a mess hall, a training center, even a feedstock area and a farming laboratorium.